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What Is Advocacy

Advocacy In Practice

Types of Advocacy

The Role of an Advocate

Why Do People Need Advocates

Principles of Sandwell Advocacy

Different Types of Advocacy

It is important to be clear about the different types as well as definitions of advocacy. The main types of advocacy are:


Citizen Advocacy:

A one to one partnership between two people. The Citizen Advocate is a volunteer who usually forms a long term relationship with their partner and takes a personal interest in ensuring that their partners interests are effectively represented. The relationship is based on trust, commitment and loyalty. There is an element of emotional support and friendship as well as a social element, which may involve introducing the partner to new experiences and/or activities.


Independent (Issue-based) Advocacy:

Can also be called crisis or case advocacy. A one to one partnership between two people, often provided by paid advocates. Independent advocacy shares the same principles as Citizen Advocacy, but is usually a short-term, one-off involvement, dealing with a specific issue in a persons life. The relationship is normally time limited, but may last for several months. When this has been done the advocacy partnership is terminated until it is required again.


Self Advocacy:

Seen by many in the advocacy movement to be the most ideal form of advocacy, and one which all other types of advocacy should be aiming to work towards. People speaking out for themselves to express their own needs and representing their own interests. Often people with some form of disability may have received some support in achieving self-advocacy – this is a model employed by People First – a group run by people with learning disabilities for people with learning disabilities.


Group Advocacy:

Where people come together to represent shared interests or goals and works by offering mutual support, skill development and a common call for change with the intention of developing or changing services.


Peer Advocacy:

Support from advocates who themselves have experience of using particular services such as mental health or learning disabilities services. Can involve people speaking up for those who cannot do so themselves and may link with group advocacy.


Legal advocacy:

Representation by legally qualified advocates, usually barristers or solicitors.


Professional Advocacy:

Representation by members of services involved in a person’s life, for example social workers or health workers. Whilst this is an important form of advocacy, most independent advocacy agencies would stress the limitations of this type of advocacy and recognise the potential conflict of interest that may arise out of professionals advocating on their service users behalf.

 

Statutory Advocacy:

Where there is a statutory duty to provide advocacy following government legislation such as Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA) and Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy (IMCA).


Family and Friend advocacy:

Where a person’s family member or members or friend(s) play a part in advocating on their behalf. Most of us will have used or provided this support at some time in our lives whether we realised it or not.


THERE ARE CLEAR LINKS BETWEEN MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF ADVOCACY & THERE CAN BE A PLACE FOR MORE THAN ONE IN A PERSONS LIFE DEPENDING ON WHAT SHE OR HE WANTS OR NEEDS.

 
 
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